The important kitchen knives you need

Posted by cornelius winters on Monday, February 29, 2016 Under: Kitchen
Even as someone who has been building a collection of knives over the past 15 years, I’ll admit that I could do pretty much everything with just three of them:

1. 8-inch Chef’s Knife

Consider this a sharp extension of your hand. The blade is long enough to slice pretty much every vegetable, and the tip is fine enough for delicate work.

BA Test Kitchen Pick: The Mac 8″ Pro Chef’s Knife with Dimples ($175) is our workhorse: The size is just right, and we love the combination of a classic Western shape with a harder steel edge. The bolsterless symmetrical blade makes for easy sharpening.

2. Paring Knife

Crucial for those times—such as hulling strawberries or coring tomatoes—when you need a knife small enough to hold above the cutting board, with a fine, maneuverable point. Read full article here...

According to Gizmodo (http://gizmodo.com/a-beginners-guide-to-buying-custom-kitchen-knives)

When selecting a set of knives for your kitchen, you can certainly go to any retail store and purchase an inexpensive set of knives made with plastic handles and low-grade steel. But, when you want something of higher quality, specialized design or materials, or you just want something a bit more personalized, custom is the way to go.

Custom knives in general have a reputation for being more expensive than production knives; however, when you start looking at mid- to high-range kitchen knives, you will notice that the prices are largely similar to most custom offerings out there. There are exceptions, of course—you can pay over $3,000 for a custom sushi knife from some makers. But there are many competitive options available for the price-conscious buyer.

Use

When embarking on your custom knife journey, the first thing to consider is what knives you need. If you currently own a block of production knives, you probably have one or two that are used frequently, while the others are rarely if ever used. Those well-used knives are the ones you're going to want to replace with customs—don't bother buying a custom bread knife if you never slice bread. I found that I am pretty well set with a chef knife and a paring knife.

In : Kitchen 


Tags: kitchen 

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